What videotape formats does O.K. Video accept?

What videotape formats does O.K. Video accept?

O.K. Video accepts many different videotape formats, listed below. Included are facts about each format and a picture for reference

VHS – Common home video format popular from the late 1970s to early 2000s. VHS tapes typically held 2 hours in Standard Play (SP) mode and up to 6 hours in Long Play (LP).
VHS-C – Smaller version of the VHS format made to be used in camcorders and played in a regular VCR using an adapter. VHS-C tapes held 30 minutes in SP and up to 90 minutes in LP.
SVHS – “Super” VHS is a higher resolution version of VHS.
Betamax – Less common home video format popular during the late 1970s to early 1980s. Betamax tapes held 60 minutes in Normal mode and 2 hours in Half mode.
Video8 video – Video8, Hi8 and Digital8 tapes are all physically similar. Video8 was the first incarnation, improved upon by the later versions. Tapes with up to 2 hours of recording time were possible.
Hi8 video – Higher quality version of Video8. Tapes with up to 2 hours of recording time were available.
Digital8 video – Digital version of the previous 2 formats. Tapes held 60 minutes in SP and 90 minutes in LP.
3/4″ or U-Matic – Broadcast/Industrial quality videotape used from the 1970s until the early 2000s.
1″ or 1 inch type B – Broadcast/industrial videotape spooled onto reels as opposed to contained in a cassette.
Betacam – Sony broadcast-quality videotape used from the early-mid 1980s. Replaced by Betacam SP.
Betacam SP – Higher resolution version of Betacam introduced in the mid-1980s and still in use today.
Mini-DV (PAL & NTSC) – Digital videotape available to consumers and professionals from the late 1990s and still in use today. 63-83 minutes of record time in SP and <90 minutes in LP.
Full-Sized DV (PAL & NTSC) – Larger version of MiniDV, these tapes fit into full-size broadcast-quality cameras and held up to 3 hours of full-resolution recordings.
DVCPRO – Panasonic digital tape format used mostly in TV broadcasting.
DVCAM – Sony digital tape format used mostly by professionals. Though DVCAM can be recorded onto standard MiniDV tapes, the tape is transported faster and only about 43 minutes of record time is available.
HDV – Hi-Definition digital tape format. Like DVCAM, the tape size is similar to a standard MiniDV tape, but recording time is reduced.

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